Much like the triggerfish, the tilefish prefers to spend its time close to coral reefs. Compared to the swordfish, these sea dwellers are incredibly small and they retain a strong importance as food fish. Tilefish can be as small as four inches or as large as 49 inches. They tend to go by different names like “blanquillo” or “camotillo” depending on the country.

Tilefish have a dorsal and anal fin, the latter of which is identified by a few spines. They are typically found in shallow water and they are also known for creating burrows to use as shelter. Even when they aren’t creating burrows, tilefish prefer to spend their downtime in reef caves, within piles of rock, or in canyons. Their diet consists largely of crustaceans such as shrimp and crab, but they are also known for incorporating sea urchins, mollusks, and small fish as food sources. An exceptional eyesight is instrumental in helping the fish catch its prey.

With their preference for seeking shelter in caves, tilefish lead solitary lives depending on the species and they also like to stay close to the bottom. In fact, should the fish be approached it will dive headfirst into its burrow to protect itself. As another safety measure, the fish is also capable of changing its color to escape predators.

Ready to take on the tilefish? Call Captain Dennis Forgione of Freespool Sport Fishing Miami at 305-582-5445 to get started with booking your fishing Miami trip. Our specialties include kite fishing, live bait fishing, and anchor fishing.

There are over thirty unique species of triggerfish, a brightly colored sea dweller easily identified by its intriguingly colorful spots and lines. You’ll find them in the tropical and subtropical oceans of the world, typically spending their time close to the coral reefs.

Despite their eye-catching and innocent looking appearance, the triggerfish is not your average fish in the sea. They have powerfully sharp teeth that are used for crushing shells and they’ve also developed a reputation for being quite grumpy. To protect themselves from predators, the fish has two dorsal fins. The first one is kept in place by the second fin, and it’s only by depressing the second that the one first is “triggered”, hence why it’s called a triggerfish.

There are some species of triggerfish known for being extremely territorial and combative. The titan and Picasso species, for example, will aggressively defend their nests and they have no issue with sinking their teeth into humans that get too close. As a matter of fact, these fish will go toe-to-toe with other fish in a school should they feel threatened. With such an ill-tempered nature, the triggerfish sort of lives by a “survival of the fittest” code.

Considering their irritable nature, triggerfish are strong fighters on light tackle and on spinning rods. Inexperienced fishers using deep-sea fishing rods should be in for quite the surprise despite the fish’s small size.

Ready to take on the triggerfish? Call Captain Dennis Forgione of Freespool Sport Fishing Miami at 305-582-5445 to get started with booking your fishing Miami trip. Our specialties include kite fishing, live bait fishing, and anchor fishing.

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at one of the most recognizable sea dwellers: the swordfish. Also known as broadbills in some parts of the world, they are known for their size and their long, flat bill which resembles a sword. Among billfish, the swordfish is one of the most popular when it comes to sport fishing.

The swordfish is typically found in the warmer areas of Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, hanging out close to the surface. The fish can reach nearly ten feet in length, though there have been cases of fishermen catching swordfish as long as fifteen feet. Interestingly, when the fish reaches adulthood it will lose all of its teeth and scales. By this time, the swordfish can roam the ocean knowing it has few natural predators with the exception of killer whales, tunas, and sharks.

Despite their bills being referred to as swords and giving off the appearance of a sharp spear, the swordfish doesn’t actually use it to spear. Instead, the fish will use it to slash at prey, causing injury and therefore making it easier to catch. Even with its sharp bill, the swordfish relies more upon its incredible speed and agility when it comes to hunting and will reserve the use of the bill for larger prey.

Ready to take on the swordfish? Call Captain Dennis Forgione of Freespool Sport Fishing Miami at 305-582-5445 to get started with booking your fishing Miami trip. Our specialties include kite fishing, live bait fishing, and anchor fishing.

To find the bluefish, you’ll need to explore the world’s subtropical and temperate waters, except the northern Pacific Ocean which the fish does not inhabit. While we call it bluefish, it is also known as elf, shad, tailor, chopper, and anchoa in other parts of the world. The fish is also referred to by the even simpler name of “blue”.

The bluefish can be identified by its broad, forked tail. It is a highly popular game fish known for its fierce aggressiveness. Bluefish tend to range in size from the smaller “snapper” which is seven inches to much larger ones that can weigh over 35 pounds in some cases.

Take a close look at the bluefish and you’ll notice its razor sharp, single row of teeth resembling the edge of a knife. With its penchant for aggressiveness, it is also incredibly strong and can be seen as part of loose groups. They are also swift swimmers, using their sharp teeth and speed to prey on forage fish, attacking them in ferocious frenzies. As a matter of fact, the fish is so aggressive, there have been moments where the bluefish will consume its young, turning to cannibalism.

Knowing just how strong and fierce the bluefish can be, it is staunchly suggested to hold bluefish with extreme care as they can very easily bite someone’s hand and cause significant injury. There are stories galore of fishermen being bitten seriously. On that note, make sure you’re not in the water when schools of bluefish are feeding.

Ready to take on the bluefish? Call Captain Dennis Forgione of Freespool Sport Fishing Miami at 305-582-5445 to get started with booking your fishing Miami trip.